picket fence tutorial

I have been trying several ways to make picket fences for Putz houses. I came up with some options, using corrugated cardboard. The cardboard I used is a thin cardboard with about seven ridges per inch. It came from a box for a dustbuster.

picket fence tutorial

The “picket” fence I describe in this post was inspired by Laney at SugarplumPatchwork.com. She used corrugated cardboard as a fence for her little Putz houses. At the end of the post I will show a couple of more detailed options.

The first job is to clean the cardboard. One side has to be removed so the ridges show. I used fine point tweezers, slipping them under the side of the cardboard and peeling it off.

picket fence tutorial

Sometimes you can peel a strip off by gripping it with the tweezers or with your fingers.

picket fence tutorial

picket fence tutorial

A stiff-bristled brush will take off some of the small bits that are left on the cardboard.

picket fence tutorial

Before using a brush on the cardboard…

picket fence tutorial

After…

picket fence tutorial

Cleaned. After brushing, little leftover bits can be picked off with tweezers, but I find that most of that doesn’t show after the cardboard is painted.

picket fence tutorial

I cut 1/2″ strips to make fencing. The height of the fence should be in proportion to your house. A larger house than I usually make would need a taller fence.

picket fence tutorial

picket fence tutorial

Zigzag scissors add a good “picket” finish to the top.

picket fence tutorial

picket fence tutorial

The end of the cardboard strip isn’t cut quite straight, so I trimmed that next.

picket fence tutorial

picket fence tutorial

I chose a church to sit on this base.

picket fence tutorial

When I paint a fence, I use two coats. The first coat is 1:1 white glue and paint.

picket fence tutorial

The holes made by the cardboard can be filled with molding paste, spackling, artificial snow (like Snow-Tex), or just paint over them. Painting over them worked well for me because the holes were very small in this thin cardboard.

picket fence tutorial

picket fence tutorial

The second coat of paint gets an addition of fine white sand to give the paint some texture.

picket fence tutorial

picket fence tutorial

picket fence tutorial

While the second coat of paint is still wet, I put glitter on it. This is the glitter I like to use.

picket fence tutorial

The pencil may give you some sense of the scale.

picket fence tutorial

When the fencing is dry, it’s time to add it to the base. I begin by making a judgement about how long the fence will be. Should there be a large gap in the front or a small one? And should I add fence posts or not? How many? Depends on the house, your own judgement, what you do or don’t like. As with all crafting and art work, each artist brings his or her own skill and judgement to the project. Don’t compare your work with someone else. Develop your own style!

picket fence tutorial

For this one, I decided to use two fence posts in the front. I bent the fencing around the corners. When I got to the back right hand corner, I cut the fence.

picket fence tutorial

Making cuts like that are best done at the back where they are not as noticeable. They are easy to disguise with faux snow, paint and glitter, though, so if you need to make a cut in the front, do that. I never make a cut in the middle of a fence length, though. Always at a fence post or in a corner.

picket fence tutorial

I use large pins to hold the fence in place until I am ready to glue it down.

picket fence tutorial

Now, where to cut the fence in the front?

picket fence tutorial

Measure the side you’ve already worked on. Then use that measurement as a guide for the other side.

picket fence tutorial

picket fence tutorial

Pinned and ready to set the fence posts.

picket fence tutorial

Before gluing…

picket fence tutorial

I use hot glue to attach the fence to the base. When gluing the cut corner, I spread a little glue all the way up and down the cut.

picket fence tutorial

Each inside corner gets a bit of glue. I start in the corner and pull it away, in both directions. That gives the glue a larger area of contact and also makes it is easy to camouflage the glue as a snow drift.

picket fence tutorial

I do the same on the outside corners.

picket fence tutorial

If the fence is one long piece across the back, I will add an anchor of glue in the middle, on the inside of the fence to give it more stability. Just another little snow drift. :)

picket fence tutorial

I glue all the way around the fence posts, drawing the line of glue a little bit down the fence line. People can’t resist touching the fence or the fence posts, for some reason. Those items need to be very stable for the sake of longevity.

picket fence tutorial

And there you have it. Ready to paint and glitter before gluing down the church. Much easier to do without the building in the way.

picket fence tutorial

I experimented with two other options, using a hand punch that makes a small rectangular hole. These pieces were made with larger corrugated cardboard (four ridges per inch). The top piece of fencing was trimmed with the zigzag scissors. The other piece was left straight.

picket fence tutorial

This is the Fiskars punch I used for these fences. It makes a 1/4″ rectangular hole. Yes, it is a bit tedious to punch all those holes, but it is worth it to me. I think the fences add a lot of lovely detail to the Putz houses.

Picket fence tutorial for Putz house

Picket fence tutorial for Putz house

The little white rectangle on the punch is one I added. I do that to all my punches so I can easily see which is which. Why they don’t come that way is beyond me.

Punches

Here is a view from the top to show how well the sandy paint filled in the holes.

picket fence tutorial

This picture shows the filled holes in the top bit of fencing. The other piece of fencing is sitting upside-down so you can see the holes. I don’t fill those as they will be glued down to the base and won’t show when the house it done.

picket fence tutorial

Close up of the bit of fencing that was trimmed on top with the zigzag scissors. Personally, I think the zigzag worked better with the smaller corrugated cardboard.

Picket fence for Putz house

This picture shows the two sizes of corrugated cardboard I used. The top piece has about seven ridges per inch. The bottom piece has four ridges per inch.

picket fence tutorial

I think that is all my mind can handle about picket fences for Putz houses for now. %-)

Here is a tutorial I made about making fences for Putz houses. It has instructions in it for a picket fence made with the above punch and a flat piece of cardboard. tutorial for making fences for putz houses

fence with no posts

Here is a previous tutorial about attaching fences and posts to bases. tutorial: attaching putz fence and fence posts to the base.

If you make picket fences for Putz houses, I would love to see examples. However you make them!

~~Rhonda

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*