red and green Santa house

I call this one the Santa house because of the picture on the Christmas card I used as a base for this Putz house. This particular pattern makes a very cozy looking PUtz, in my opinion.

Red and Green Putz House

This sweet card made the perfect base.

Red and Green Putz House

Two tiny resin snowmen stand vigil in the front yard.

Red and Green Putz House

They left the light on for you…

Red and Green Putz House

Detail of the front porch.

Red and Green Putz House

Red and Green Putz House

All my Putz creations come with the tradition hole in the back for lighting the Putz house.

Red and Green Putz House

Red and Green Putz House

Red and Green Putz House

This house is now listed in my Etsy shop. ChristmasNotebook.etsy.com

Red and Green Putz House

If you are interested in crafting some Putz houses of your own, check out my Putz tutorials for more information. Putz House Tutorials

I am always happy to answer questions about the process. Please ask, if you are wondering about the details of putzing!

~~Rhonda

putz houses and putz barns

During the past week or so, I have finished two Putz houses and two Putz barns. The barns have sold, and the houses are in my Etsy shop. ChristmasNotebook.etsy.com

All proceeds from my shop support the work of Kenya Mercy Ministries. Purchases help children and their families who live in the largest slum in Africa.

This is the latest house I finished.

Putz House

The bottle brush trees are decorated with nonfuntioning Christmas tree lights and a smiling snowman greets visitors in the front yard.

Putz House

I drew the pattern in 2012 with inspiration from this vintage Putz house. I found the picture on Ebay, but there is no longer an applicable link.

Putz House

The base…

Putz House

I like to use Christmas cards for the base, so there is a little surprise on the bottom of the Putz house.

Putz House

We left the lights on for you…

Putz House

I designed the pattern for this cute little Putz house.

Putz House

I love the colors on the Christmas card used as the base.

Putz House

The red berries pick up on the red berries on the Christmas card.

Putz House

This sweet, little red barn was inspired by the picture on the card. The barn has sold locally and will soon be off to a very good home.

Putz House

Putz House

I love this ivory and brown Putz barn which is on its way to Oklahoma. I almost kept it for my own collection, but it sold about five hours after I posted it, and I am glad to have the donation for Kenya Mercy Ministries.

Putz House

Isn’t it cute with the lights on.

Putz House

The base…

Putz House

I had the perfect tiny horses for the barnyard.

Putz House

I am currently working on a Putz house using this card and these paint colors.

Santa card for Putz house

I hope to have it ready to list in my Etsy shop by Monday. We will be celebrating my Dad’s 85th birthday tomorrow, so I won’t be in the craft room for a few days.

ChristmasNotebook.etsy.com

If you are interested in crafting some Putz houses of your own, check out my Putz tutorials for more information. Putz House Tutorials

I am always happy to answer questions about the process. Please ask, if you are wondering about the details of putzing!

~~Rhonda

tennessee putz church

Last fall, I had a custom order for a Putz church that replicates the customer’s home church in Nolensville, Tennessee. It is 180 years old and is a beautiful historic landmark. I realized I hadn’t posted about this project, so decided to do it now. I hope you enjoy the process!

While preparing to make a pattern for the building, I found this picture on flickr.com and gained a lot of useful information from it. Click the link to check out the photograph of the church.

I am so happy I tackled this huge project. It was a daunting one, but I enjoyed it! A new Putz always starts with a pattern. After I googled the church online, I printed some pictures to work from.

TN church

There are a lot of little pieces to this pattern.

TN church

The pattern pieces are cut from medium weight poster board.

TN church

Detail of the steeple construction.

TN church

TN church

Painting and glittering the church…

TN church

This picture shows the sand texture of the paint.

TN church

I painted the roof red, then realized later that the large roof is actually grey and only the roof on the steeple is red!

TN church

TN church

I used toothpicks to make the little toppers for the four corners of the steeple.

TN church

It’s coming together.

TN church

TN church

TN church

Gluing on the window frames. Clothspins make great clamps.

TN church

Notice the main roof is now a dark grey.

TN church

Now for the details. The church has a portico. Here’s the dormer for that.

Putz Church

Testing the portico posts.

Putz Church

I decided to raise the base so I could add the steps in front of the church.

Putz Church

Putz Church

The final embellishments.

Putz Church

Detail of the portico.

Putz Church

The front door is 1 1/8″ tall. I made the wreaths with tiny punchouts, glue and glitter. I used 1/4″ tubular beads for the door handles.

Putz church

Two bottle brush trees flank the front of the church.

Putz Church

I kept the embellishments simple so the church remains the main focus.

Putz Church

Close-up of the bell tower.

Putz Church

Putz Church

The base is a beautiful nativity scene in red and foiled gold.

Putz Church

I used printable glitter paper to make the sign for the front of the Putz.

Putz Church

From the back…

Putz Church

Side views…

Putz Church

Putz Church

I am very proud of the way the Putz church turned out. It was hard to let go of this beautiful church, but it now resides in a happy home in Nolensville, Tennessee. I have finished a few other custom orders and have enjoyed each one! I am hoping to make a few of our local buildings as Putzes this year.

~~Rhonda

ivory and grey putz house

My latest Putz house took longer to finish than usual. I had to work out a few problems as I went along. But I am very happy with the way it came out. I had hoped to add green shutters but there wasn’t enough room on the front between the two windows. Next time I make it, I will move those windows farther apart and add the shutters. I’ll add a chimney or two, also.

ivory and grey Putz house

The process began when I chose this Christmas card as a base. I like to make bases ahead of time so I have them ready when I’m making a new Putz house. I match the new house to the colors used on the card base. I liked the house on this card so much that I decided to draft a pattern for it.

ivory and grey Putz house

When I start a new pattern, I rough it out on graph paper. I don’t use a ruler or a straight edge at this point. I just count squares.

ivory and grey Putz house

I copy and cut the pattern pieces and glue them together to make a paper mockup. This shows me immediately if there are errors that need to be corrected.

drafting a putz pattern

When the pattern is corrected, I draw over the rough pencil lines with a permanent, fine point, black pen. I prefer the PRECISE V5 Rolling Ball Extra Fine pen. It makes a thin, dark line and doesn’t soak into the paper making large dots of ink.

ivory and grey Putz house

I mark each pattern page with MASTER, using a bright yellow highlighter. This has saved me from cutting into the original pattern several times. I also add my web address and my name.

drafting a putz pattern

After the ink is dry and any whiteout used is dry, I erase all the pencil lines and the pattern is ready to copy. I cut all the pieces apart and then they are ready to cut from poster board.

ivory and grey Putz house

After cutting the pattern pieces, I add the window panes.

ivory and grey Putz house

ivory and grey Putz house

When I glue the pieces together, I love to use these little “push pin” magnets to hold the seams together till they dry.

ivory and grey Putz house

Here’s another picture of the magnets in use on a different pattern. I also like the alligator clips with no teeth for use as clamps when making Putz houses.

construction of a Putz house

In process…

ivory and grey Putz house

After I finished the Putz house (the one on the right), I decided the scale was too large for the base, so I drafted a smaller version and it was much better.

ivory and grey Putz house

I cut a tiny bottle brush tree into sections and trimmed them to use as shrubs along the front of the house. Then I added two other bottle brush trees to the yard. They were liberally sprinkeld with glass glitter.

ivory and grey Putz house

ivory and grey Putz house

ivory and grey Putz house

ivory and grey Putz house

ivory and grey Putz house

ivory and grey Putz house

ivory and grey Putz house

ivory and grey Putz house

ivory and grey Putz house

I hope you enjoyed seeing part of the Putzing process. This house is listed in my Etsy shop. You can see many of my other Putz houses and churches there, as well.

ChristmasNotebook.etsy.com

If you are interested in crafting some Putz houses of your own, check out my Putz tutorials for more information. Putz House Tutorials

Thanks for stopping by! ~~Rhonda

new putz houses listed to etsy

Today, I listed three Putz houses and a church to my Etsy shop. ChistmasNotebook.etsy.com

The church is a tall steepled building with a pretty bell tower.

Blue and Orange Putz Church

I like to use nativity pictures from Christmas cards on the bases of my Putz churches. This one features the shepherds.

Blue and Orange Putz Church

I love the blue color on this church. It’s Apple Barrel “Cobalt Blue.”

Blue and Orange Putz Church

Blue and Orange Putz Church

This green and grey two-story house with a wrap-around porch was a new challenge for me. I drew the pattern, made a paper mockup, made a few revisions, then constructed the house.

Green and Grey Putz House

The colors are inspired by the Christmas card on the base.

Green and Grey Putz House

The porch roof took a little fiddling to get it just right. It came out well, though. I like this house so much that I thought about keeping it for my own collection, but finally decided to list it to Etsy.

Green and Grey Putz House

The fence is made from corrugated cardboard.

Green and Grey Putz House

I drew the pattern for this sweet little house last week and was very happy with the way it turned out.

Ivory and Blue Putz House

Ivory and Blue Putz House

A little bit of polyester fluff makes a great puff of smoke for the chimney.

Ivory and Blue Putz House

Ivory and Blue Putz House

This little dark grey and blue house is one made from a pattern I drew in 2012.

Grey and Blue Putz House

I love the simple Putz designs.

Grey and Blue Putz House

This tiny deer was just the right size for the little Putz house. I spread glue over the deer and then dipped him in clear very fine glitter. It doesn’t cover the color, but gives him some sparkle.

Grey and Blue Putz House

Grey and Blue Putz House

The windows are framed in forest green.

Grey and Blue Putz House

I’m working on some Bethlehem Putz houses, using nativity Christmas cards for the bases. I hope to share some of those soon. Right now, I’m trying to decide if I want to put snow on them or not…

If you are interested in crafting some Putz houses of your own, check out my Putz tutorials for more information. Putz House Tutorials

~~Rhonda

tutorial ~ making putz bases from greeting cards

In 2012, I wrote a tutorial for making Putz bases. Putz Base Tutorial
At some point after that, I began making bases for my Putz houses and churches from greeting cards. It has become my trademark for the Putz houses and churches I sell on Etsy. This tutorial is an updated version of the first base tutorial, specifically explaining how I use a greeting card as the base. I hope you will enjoy giving this method a try!

I like using greeting cards to make the bases so each of my houses has a surprise on the bottom. When you lift the house and peek underneath, you will find a greeting card picture. I try to coordinate each house with the picture on the base. This is the Putz house I made for the base I constructed to illustrate this tutorial.

Putz base

This is the bottom of the base, showing the Christmas card I used to make the base.

Putz base

Supplies needed:

  • an assortment of greeting cards to choose from. You will need one per base.
  • a paper cutter
  • scissors
  • clear acrylic ruler
  • scoring tool
  • white glue (like Elmer’s or Tacky Glue)
  • eight clothespins or craft clamps
  • corrugated cardboard (I use the flaps from cardboard shipping boxes)
  • hot glue gun and glue sticks
  • Filler (like spackling or Golden Light Molding Paste)
  • white acrylic craft paint
  • Floetrol (paint conditioner), optional
  • paint brush (I like a 1/4″ – 1/2″ wide, flat brush)
  • fine sand (optional for texturing the paint)
  • white or clear glitter (I like to use a fine glitter on the top of the base and a more coarse one on the sides of the base.)

Regarding sand: I add sand to my paint mixture because it adds the texture seen on many vintage Putz houses. It will eventually ruin a paint brush, though, so use a cheap paint brush if you are using sand.

The first part of the process is to make a box from a greeting card. Keep in mind, that when you make the box, you will be making the top of the box from the picture side of the card and the bottom from the back of the card. However, when you make that box into a Putz base, the top becomes the bottom, which means the box will be upside down so you can see the picture when you tip the house up a bit. I have found that the box as a base works best if the gap between the top of the box and the bottom of the box is facing up. It’s easier to hide when you paint the box. Trust me on this. You will see what I mean as you make a base.

To begin, choose a greeting card that you like. Or you can practice on cards you don’t like! Keep in mind that the picture on the front of the card will lose a border all the way around. If the sides of the box you’re making are 1/2″ tall, the picture will lose 1/2″ all the way around. Some cards won’t be usable. For instance, if the card has a Christmas tree on it and the star at the top is right up to the edge of the card, the resulting base may show a tree, but no star. It can be useful to make a 1/2″ guide. Two L-shaped pieces of cardstock, with both legs of the L 1/2″ wide, can be placed, overlapping on the face of the card, to show you just what will show on the finished box top.

In this example, you can see the guides I made and the greeting card I am thinking of using.

making Putz bases

With the guides in place, you can see that the sides of the finished box will cut the deer’s head off, which won’t look good on the finished base.

making Putz bases

The card would be usable, however, if it were trimmed this way:

making Putz bases

Sometimes cutting a feature from the card is fine. In this picture, you can see that the words have been cropped from the right side. This card didn’t have enough leeway all the way around to leave all the words visible. To me, this can be charming, as in this example. But some cards can lose too many important pieces of the picture to be usable as a base.

Rounded Roof / base

I often make bases in a batch, several at a time. I choose cards I like and then, when I’m ready to make a Putz house, I choose a house or church pattern that I think will coordinate with the picture on the pre-made base, and I choose the colors for the house or church from the colors in the picture on the card.

Putz base

Cut the front of the card from the back. Cut along the fold. I like to make the cut so the front of the card doesn’t have any part of the fold on it when finished. A paper cutter like the one pictured makes a straight clean line, though you can use scissors if you don’t have a paper cutter. Hold the card with one hand as you slice with the other, to keep the line straight.

Putz base

You will have two pieces.

Putz base

Hold the pieces together, line them up and see if they are the same size.

Putz base

Putz base

If the two pieces aren’t exactly the same size, cut them to the same width and length. When they are the same, you will then cut a bit from the BACK piece only. Cut two very thin strips (less than 1/8″) from one long side and from one short side. Trimming this very small bit from the back of the card (which makes the bottom of the box) will insure the bottom fits into the top piece when assembled. But, if you cut too much off the BACK piece, the top and bottom of the finished box will be too loose to fit together snugly. This can take a little practice to make the two parts of the box fit together just right. Practice makes perfect! 🙂

Putz base

The next step is to score the sides. Place the ruler over 1/2″ of the side of the card. When scoring, hold the ruler down tightly so you make a straight score line.

Putz base

You can use a small ball stylus tool, as I’m using in the following picture, or a bone folder or other blunt object that will make a narrow crease in the face of the card. You don’t want to cut all the way through the card. The purpose of the crease is to make the card stock easy to fold along a straight line. My default base is 1/2″ thick, but they can be as thin or as thick as you want to make them. Sometimes, I make them 1/4″ thick or 3/8″ thick, if the picture on the front of the card requires that to get an important part of the picture included in the finished piece.

Putz base

Score all four sides of the front and all four sides of the back of the card. This picture shows the crease lines made by the scoring tool.

Putz base

Cut into the long sides of both the front and back of the card, from the edge, along the crease line, just to the crosswise crease line. I always make these cuts on the long sides of the cards so the resulting flaps will be glued to the sides of the box and not to the ends. You’ll see what I mean as you go along.

Putz base

Fold all the creases toward the inside of the box.

Putz base

Use white glue to glue the flaps to the inside of the box. Clothespins make great clamps. If the glue dries to the clothespin, just wiggle it back and forth till it lets go.

Putz base

Putz base

Finished box, top and bottom.

Putz base

Put it together to be sure it fits well. Don’t leave it together for long, though, in case there is a dab of wet glue that will dry and lock your box shut tight…BTDT.

Putz base

Side note: These Christmas card boxes make great gift boxes for small items. A box can be made with one-inch sides and it will hold an ornament or candy or other small item. No wrapping paper needed. Tie with a ribbon and it’s good to go.

boxes

The next phase is filling the box to make it sturdy. I use corrugated cardboard from shipping boxes like ones I get in a steady supply from Amazon. Use the BOTTOM of the box to measure the cardboard. I have to set the top aside so I don’t accidently fill it with cardboard. Once that’s glued in, there’s no taking it out if it has been glued into the top of the box. Other items can be used as filler. Styrofoam sheets would probably work, other kinds of thin cardboard, foamcore board, etc. Corrugated cardboard is free and I like the stability it gives the base.

Putz base

I use a box cutter to cut my cardboard pieces, but you can use a craft knife, Xacto knife or scissors.

Putz base

If it’s too big, like this example, just trim it down till it fits. Don’t force the sides of the box wider than they should be or the top won’t fit well.

Putz base

When you have a piece that fits well, you can use it to trace two or three more pieces of cardboard. I spread white glue over the inside of the bottom of the box, then place the first piece of cardboard. I use hot glue between the cardboard layers. If you use hot glue on the box itself, you may see the lines of hot glue through the box, on the outside, when it has hardened.

Putz base

Usually four pieces of cardboard fill a box perfectly for me. But, sometimes, like this example, you may need a bit more filling, but another piece of the same cardboard would be too much. When this happens, I cut the last piece from poster board. One layer is usually all I need to fill the box properly.

Putz base

You can see the white posterboard here. And now it’s time to glue the sides with some hot glue. I run a bead, one side at at time, just inside the box. I hold the box up on its side with the glued side down on a piece of scrap cardboard till the hot glue sets. If it runs out the gap when pressed on the scrap cardboard, just swipe it while still melty to leave a smooth finish. You don’t want any glue bumps hardened in place.

Putz base

It’s time to put the top of the box on. Again, white glue on the inside of the box. Smooth it out in an even layer.

Putz base

Putz base

Fit the pieces of the box together and press the top of the box lightly to be sure the glue adheres the top of the box to the top of the cardboard filling. I usually turn it upside down on my work table and press it gently. The construction of the base is now done.

Putz base

The next step is to turn the box over and check for gaps. This particular box came together very well. When there are gaps, I use Golden Molding Paste to fill the gaps as smoothly as possible. After half an hour or so, when it is dry, I sand it smooth with a nail file.

Putz base

When any gaps have been filled and filed smooth, it’s time to paint the base. As you can see, what was the bottom of the box, is now the top of the base. I give the top of the base and the sides of the base a coat of white acrylic craft paint and let that dry.

Then I give just the top of the base a second coat with my paint mixture. I mix the acrylic paint 1:1 with white glue (I use Elmers). A couple of tablespoons of paint to a couple of tablespoons of glue. No need to measure exactly. Just eyeball it. I like to add a teaspoon of paint conditioner like Floetrol to make the paint slide on smoothly. That’s totally optional. Stir the paint mixture well. Then, stir in about two teaspoons of fine sand (like playground sand). Give just the top of the base a coat of the sandy paint mixture.

Putz base

Let the first coat of the paint mixture dry. Paint on a second coat and, while the paint is wet, sprinke the fine glitter over the top of the base. Tap off the extra glitter and let the paint dry.

Putz base

Nice and sparkly.

Putz base

Side note: If you don’t have a lipped glitter tray, and you love glitter, invest in a set. I have a large one and a small one. I use both of them all the time. They are useful for sorting beads and other small items as well as for glitter. You can see examples here: Glitter trays

To paint and glitter the sides, I use the same paint mixture over the base coat of acrylic paint. I do one side at a time. Let the first coat of the paint mixture dry, then add a second coat. While the second coat of paint mixture is still wet, set the side into the glitter of your choice. I like to use a coarser glitter on the sides as a contrast to the fine glitter on the top of the base.

Putz base

Putz base

Once the base is completely dry, it’s time to add a house.

Putz base

Putz base

When it’s time to glue the house to the base, check the picture and be sure it is oriented in the right direction when the house is tipped backward to see the picture. I’ve had to pry houses off bases after I had them glued down because the base was turned the wrong way. Not fun! Check first. Glue second.

Putz base

dark blue and brown Putz house

You can find my other Putz house tutorials here: Putz House Tutorials

I appreciate your comments and I am happy to answer questions you may have about the process of making a base or about any of the other bits and bobs of making Putz houses. It’s a wonderful hobby and one, I am sure you can tell, I enjoy a great deal!

Happy Putzing! ~~Rhonda 🙂

three new putz houses listed to my etsy shop

I just listed three Putz houses to my Etsy shop. ChristmasNotebook.etsy.com
I drew the patterns for each of these houses myself, using vintage Putz houses as my inspiration.

The first house is a lovely dark blue and brown Putz with light blue details.

dark blue and brown Putz house

The picture on the base features a beautiful shade of blue with a splash of brown and a dash of red.

dark blue and brown Putz house

The red berries pick up on that pretty red star on the base.

dark blue and brown Putz house

Don’t you love the awning over the windows?

dark blue and brown Putz house

The second house is purple and green with a periwinkle blue fence.

purple and green Putz house

The colors are inspired by this beautiful Christmas card.

purple and green Putz house

The branches of the trees on the greeting card are lined in iridescent foil. I used iridescent glitter to highlight the snow that decorates the Putz.

purple and green Putz house

The chimney comes with an optional puff of smoke.

purple and green Putz house

The three bottle brush trees are covered with snow. The two larger trees are decorated with vintage mercury beads in silver.

purple and green Putz house

The third house comes in teal and dark red.

teal and dark red Putz house

The base features a vintage style Santa in the same colors.

teal and dark red Putz house

The bottle brush trees are covered with a fine teal glitter and a tiny snowman greets visitors.

teal and dark red Putz house

The house features a widow’s walk and a balcony.

teal and dark red Putz house

All my houses come with a hole in the back for adding your LED lights to make the houses glow.

purple and green Putz house

purple and green Putz house

100% of the proceeds from my shop supports the work of Kenya Mercy Ministries, an organization that works with the urban poor in Nairobi, Kenya, particularly the children and their families living in Kibera, the largest slum in Africa. I appreciate everyone who checks out my Etsy shop and considers helping these children by purchasing my work. Thank you!

If you are interested in making your own Putz houses, you will find my tutorials at the following link. Click the link and scroll down to see the entire list. I am happy to answer any questions you may have about the process.

Putz Tutorials

~~Rhonda

spring has finally arrived

Spring is running about three weeks later than usual here. But things are looking up. It finally got warm enough that I ventured out into the garden to see what’s blooming.

spring. finally!

First the daffodils. So cheery! And they can take a freeze and keep on blooming.

daffodils

These are ‘Easter Bonnet.’

'Easter Bonnet' daffodils

Mini daff called ‘Tete-a-Tete.’ The blooms are about an inch across and the plant is 6-8″ tall.

'Tete-a-tete' daffodils

daffodils

‘Poets’ daffodil…these came from my husband’s family.

'Poets' daffodils

The peonies are up, though not showing buds yet. The daffodils in the background also came from DH’s family farm.

Peonies are up!

The grape hyacinths are up!

daffodils

The flowering almond will burst open in the next day or two.

Flowering Almond

And the lilacs, too…

Lilac

The ‘Jane’ magnolia just opened its first blossoms Thursday. It will be covered in a few days.

'Jane' magnolia

'Jane' magnolia

This flowering fruit tree popped up next to the compost pile. A volunteer. We will have to wait to see what quality of fruit it provides, but the blossoms are beautiful!

peach tree?

The Lenten Rose has been blooming for a few weeks. We found a volunteer Lenten Rose about fifteen feet from this one.

Lenten Rose

And the hostas are popping up! This is ‘Journey’s End’ which gets quite large.

'Journey's End' hosta

We host a beehive for friends and the bees are busy enjoying all the lovely flowers.

honey bees

In our little one acre wood, the bluebells are nearing the end of their bloom time.

Virginia Bluebells

The bloodroot is out. Such a beautiful white!

Bloodroot

We found a lone trillium.

trilium

If the warmer weather holds, we will soon have peonies. I’m looking forward to those!

~~Rhonda

gallery of putz houses…part 2

The first part of this “gallery of Putz houses” can be found here:

gallery of putz houses…part 1

Following are more Putz houses I have completed during the past few months. The first one is one of my favorite Easter Putz churches. It has sold. Wasn’t in the Etsy shop long!

Putz House

I love the details on this one. The little mulberry paper flowers were purchased. I made the tiny Easter eggs from clay.

Easter Putz Church

This Easter church is similar with the same kinds of flowers and Easter eggs. The base measures 4 3/4″ wide by 6″ deep. The church is 6 1/4″ tall as measured from the bottom of the base to the top of the steeple.

Easter Putz Church

Easter Putz Church

Putz House

Next up are two Christmas Tree Lots. The first one features lights, Santa’s mailbox, trees and wreaths. Each of my Christmas tree lots gets a unique name. This one is the “North Woods” tree lot.

Putz House

Sometimes it can be hard to find a large enough Christmas card with a horizontal layout for the base of the tree lots as they are a bit larger than the usual Putz I make. This one was perfect at 7 3/4″ wide by 5 1/2″ deep.

Putz House

The second tree lot is the “Holly Days” tree lot.

Putz House

The base features a classic Christmas plaid with the red done in foil.

Putz House

This tree lot is decorated with a garland of evergreen all along the fence.

Putz House

I designed this simple Putz because I like the idea of a curved roof.

Putz House

Putz House

The base is a picture of a cozy Christmas kitty.

Putz House

I drew the pattern for this one from a picture I found online of someone else’s house, so this pattern isn’t featured in my Etsy shop. But I love the design and, at some point, will draw a barn and silo pattern similar to this house.

Putz House

I designed this simple country church with a curved roof, also.

Putz House

My Putz churches are always done with a religious Christmas card as a base.

Putz House

Another new design. I love this shade of blue.

Putz House

Putz House

And its base.

Putz House

This is the same pattern as the house above, but done in a different color scheme. Wisps of polyester stuffing make perfect puffs of smoke.

Putz House

Putz House

Putz House

The base is a pretty Christmas card in grey and ivory.

Putz house base

The last house is a personal favorite. I wasn’t sure about the color scheme at first, but once the house was finished with the embellishments, I decided I love it!

Putz House

The colors are taken from the Christmas card on the base.

Putz House

Putz House

Putz House

If you’re still here, thanks for hanging on till the end! I hope you enjoyed it. Comment below if you have a favorite and what you like about it. I’d love the feedback.

My Putz houses are available for purchase in my Etsy shop ChristmasNotebook.etsy.com.

All proceeds from my shop support Kenya Mercy Ministries. This organization provides help to the urban poor of Nairobi, Kenya, particularly the children and their families of Kibera, the largest slum in Africa.

I appreciate each person who helps me provide for these children by purchasing items from my shop! A big shout-out goes to all those who donate greeting cards to me for the crafts I make to sell in the shop. I can’t tell you how much I appreciate the donations of Christmas cards and other greeting cards.

If you are interested in making your own Putz houses, check out the information, how-tos and tips in my Putz tutorials. Putz Tutorial List
I am always happy to help with advice, if you have any questions. Just ask!

~~Rhonda

gallery of putz houses…part 1

I have taken quite a bit of time off blog writing. Not intentionally. It just seemed to work out that way. I do enjoy writing my blog and have no desire to give it up. Sometimes, though, other than a few faithful commenters, I wonder if anyone else is listening. The other day someone I just met told me he has followed my blog for a long time (thank you, Clinton!). That makes me think there are surely others out there that enjoy reading this little blog. You never know who’s listening. But knowing someone is, gives me some energy to get back at it.

I have made quite a few Putz houses in the past six weeks or so. I’m going to share some pictures. I hope they inspire other Putzers out there to continue to create, hone their craft, and share what they’re doing.

This little dusky rose and medium brown Putz house is one I designed last week. The bottle brush trees are decorated with pearl beads in shades of pink and brown. The fence was cut with large-scallop decorative scissors.

Dusky Rose and Brown Putz House

I make the bases for my Putz houses from greeting cards. This one, for the base of the dusky rose house, has a Victorian theme. I chose the dusky rose to match the shading on the angel’s wings.

Dusky Rose and Brown Putz House

I wasn’t sure about the color scheme for this Putz house until I finished it. I love the way it turned out. The trees are decorated with vintage mercury beads.

Blue and Orange Putz House

The base is one of my favorite Christmas cards. It has tiny metallic gold dots over the entire picture.

Blue and Orange Putz House

This little house reminds me of a Swiss chalet. I kept the decorations as simple as possible. Two undecorated trees and lots of snow. After I made the pattern, I realized the inspiration picture I used for the design was not of a vintage house, so this particular pattern won’t show up in my Etsy shop. I’ll put it in my personal collection.

Putz House

Putz House

Its base is another card I love.

Putz House

Isn’t this house lovely? It evokes nostalgia for me. I can just imagine the family gathered around the Christmas tree, happy and delighted.

Putz House

The card is a simple design with the gold done in foil.

Putz house base

Next time I make this pattern, I will make the window frame for the four windows in one piece.

Putz House

The small blue and green Putz house is a favorite. I like the bump-out doorway.

Putz House

The base is a cute little teddy bear and his toy sheep.

Putz house base

Here’s another small and traditional design…

Putz House

…with a sweet Christmas card as the base.

Putz House

I have seven more Putz to share. I’ll do that in another post.

My Putz houses are available for purchase in my Etsy shop ChristmasNotebook.etsy.com.

All proceeds from my shop support Kenya Mercy Ministries. This organization provides help to the urban poor of Nairobi, Kenya, particularly the children and their families of Kibera, the largest slum in Africa.

I appreciate each person who helps me provide for these children by purchasing items from my shop! A big shout-out goes to all those who donate greeting cards to me for the crafts I make to sell in the shop. I can’t tell you how much I appreciate the donations of Christmas cards and other greeting cards.

If you are interested in making your own Putz houses, you can find a lot of information, how-tos and tips in my Putz tutorials. Putz Tutorial List
I am always happy to help with advice, if you have questions. Just ask!

~~Rhonda