drawing a roof for a putz house bumpout or porch

If you have questions about this process, please ask. I will edit the tutorial to reflect points that clarify the instructions. Following is a picture of the simple pattern I drew to illustrate the process.

tutorial putz porch roof

On the pattern, dotted lines are fold lines and solid lines are cut lines.
Brown = The depth of the bumpout or porch.
Blue = Midline of the side of the house
Red = Half the width of the side of the house
Yellow = Roof overhang
Purple = Length of the roof angle of the bumpout, plus 1/4″ overhang

tutorial putz porch roof

To draw a pattern for the roof of a bumpout or a porch, several measurements are needed. You need to know:
How wide is half the side of the building (red)?
How deep is the bumpout (brown)?
How long is the slant of the roof line of the bumpout (purple) plus 1/4″ for the overhang?

tutorial putz porch roof

The measurement of the folded part of the roof from back to front (Line AB), is the total of (1) half the width of the side of the house (red) plus (2) the depth of the bumpout (brown) plus (3) the depth of the overhang (yellow).

drawing a putz house roof

Draw the length of the fold line of the roof, using the total of the three measurements. Line AB.
From the bottom of the fold line (at point B), draw a perpendicular line to each side. Line BC and Line BD. Each side of this line is the length of the angle of the roof line (purple) plus a 1/4″ overhang (yellow).
On this pattern, the length of the angle of the roof line is 7/8″. That plus the 1/4″ of the overhang equals 1 1/8″. The front of the bumpout roof (Line DC) is a total of 2 1/4″ (twice the length of the roof angle including the overhang).

At each end of the perpendicular line, draw a line up that is the depth of the bumpout (brown) plus the 1/4″ overhang (yellow). Line DE and Line CF.

From the tops of the lines on the sides, draw angled lines to the top of the fold line. Line EA and Line FA.

When fitting the roof to the bumpout or porch, check that the ridge line (folded part) of the roof is level. Also, check that the end of the fold (at point A) is in line with the middle of the bumpout or porch section.

I use hot glue to attach the roof.

tutorial putz porch roof

In this photo, you can see the roof supports that I build into my pattern. This gives a good platform for adding hot glue before attaching the roof. When the Putz is assembled, I run a line of hot glue in the valley where the roof of the overhang meets the main roof of the house. That is covered with faux snow in the finishing of the house.

IMG_E4832

There are surely others ways to do this process, but this is my way. I hope you find it useful!

Here are a couple of examples of such roofs on Putz I’ve made.

MINI Grey and Red Putz house
ORIGINAL Teal and Green Putz House

You can see my Putz houses and Christmas ornaments in my Etsy shop.

ChristmasNotebook.etsy.com

If you are interested in crafting Putz houses of your own, check out my other Putz tutorials for more information. Putz House Tutorials

I am always happy to answer questions about the process. Please ask, if you are wondering about the details of putzing!

All proceeds from my Etsy shop benefit Kenya Mercy Ministries. They work with the urban poor of Nairobi, Kenya, particularly the children and their families who live in Kibera, the largest slum in Africa. Thank you for your part in helping these children when you purchase items from my shop!

~~Rhonda

green putz barn

This sweet, ORIGINAL size, Putz barn started with the card I used for the base.

ORIGINAL Light green and grey Putz Barn

The card depicts a winter orchard. The picture is covered with very fine, iridescent glitter. A strip of seafoam green runs along the bottom of the picture and the word “Peace” is colored with the same green.

ORIGINAL Light green and grey Putz Barn

I knew I wanted to use this greeting card. I just had to find the right barn for it. I googled “old barns” and came up with a picture of one I could use as inspiration for the pattern I would draw.

green putz barn in progress

I like to use the colors of the greeting card used for the base to paint the Putz.

ORIGINAL Light green and grey Putz Barn

Seafoam green seemed an odd choice for the barn, but I took the plunge and I love the way it turned out. I googled “green barns” and there are some stunning ones out there.

ORIGINAL Light green and grey Putz Barn

Because the picture on the Christmas card features an orchard, I decided to make a winter fruit tree for the barnyard. This is the first time I tried making a leafless tree for a Putz. I’m happy with the results.

ORIGINAL Light green and grey Putz Barn

To make the tree, I stripped red berry picks of the berries and used the twisted wire to form the tree.

green putz barn in progress

I painted the tree with the same sandy, dark brown paint that I used on the silo and the fence. It gave some texture to the limbs and provided a great contrast to the faux snow that I used to embellish the tree. After painting it, I decided the trunk needed to be wider, so I used hot glue to fill it out and repainted the whole thing. Worked well.

green putz barn in progress

The wreath is handcrafted from an evergreen chenille stem. The fence is made from craft matchsticks for the posts and slivered popsicle sticks for the horizontal boards.

ORIGINAL Light green and grey Putz Barn

Here is a link to my tutorial about making tiny wreaths.

Making wreath and garlands for Putz houses.

And here’s a link for making post and board fences. The tutorial uses skewers for posts and poster board for boards. That works well. I now usually use wood boards, but that’s just an option. I, also, now use white, tacky glue to make the fence rather than hot glue. Takes longer to dry securely, but there are fewer messy globs.

Make a board fence for your Putz barn.

Under construction…building the fence.

green putz barn in progress
ORIGINAL Light green and grey Putz Barn

You can see my Putz houses and Christmas ornaments in my Etsy shop.

ChristmasNotebook.etsy.com

If you are interested in crafting some Putz houses of your own, check out my Putz tutorials for more information. Putz House Tutorials

I am always happy to answer questions about the process. Please ask, if you are wondering about the details of putzing!

All proceeds from my Etsy shop benefit Kenya Mercy Ministries. They work with the urban poor of Nairobi, Kenya, particularly the children and their families who live in Kibera, the largest slum in Africa. Thank you for your part in helping these children when you purchase items from my shop!

~~Rhonda

spring / Easter putz church and a house

I drew the pattern for this church last week. It started as a house, but when I was looking through my stash of Easter cards for one to use to make the base, I found one that would be perfect for a church. I drew some additional pattern pieces to make the bell tower, and I changed the front door and front window of the house to make it look more like a church.

As I worked on this MINI size, Putz church, I wasn’t sure if I liked it or not. Not my personal-favorite color of green, but, when it was finished, I was very happy with it.

MINI Light Yellow and Lime Green Easter Church

Pictures don’t do the little Putz houses justice. They are so much cuter in person.

The round window over the doors is a flattened bead cover. It makes the perfect embellishment for a church window.

MINI Light Yellow and Lime Green Easter Church

The bottle brush trees are white plastic trees that I painted to match the roof. They were sprinkled with fine, clear glitter and decorated with handcrafted Easter eggs.

MINI Light Yellow and Lime Green Easter Church

The colors for the Putz church were inspired by the colors of the upcycled greeting card used to make the base for the church.

MINI Light Yellow and Lime Green Easter Church

The white picket fence was made with coffee stirring sticks. I cut the ends off the wooden sticks to make the pickets. The rest of the stick was slivered into three, long pieces to make the horizontal boards.

A gold bell swings freely in the belfry.

MINI Light Yellow and Lime Green Easter Church

The following ORIGINAL size, yellow and green Easter/spring house was made from a pattern I drew in January. The first house I made from it was a Valentine house.

ORIGINAL size Valentine Putz house

The spring version worked well, too. I do love the shuttered windows.

ORIGINAL size Yellow and Green Easter Putz House

The house is decorated with velvet forget-me-nots and mulberry-paper flowers.

ORIGINAL size Yellow and Green Easter Putz House

The upcycled Easter card used to make the base features an Easter basket of spring flowers and Easter eggs.

ORIGINAL size Yellow and Green Easter Putz House

The fence is made from poster board and cut with a large scallop scissor to mimic the curve of the roof.

ORIGINAL size Yellow and Green Easter Putz House

You can see my Putz houses and Christmas ornaments in my Etsy shop.

ChristmasNotebook.etsy.com

If you are interested in crafting some Putz houses of your own, check out my Putz tutorials for more information. Putz House Tutorials

I am always happy to answer questions about the process. Please ask, if you are wondering about the details of putzing!

All proceeds from my Etsy shop benefit Kenya Mercy Ministries. They work with the urban poor of Nairobi, Kenya, particularly the children and their families who live in Kibera, the largest slum in Africa. Thank you for your part in helping these children when you purchase items from my shop!

~~Rhonda

mini size Easter putz church

I just finished this MINI size, Easter church. It was a lot of fun to make and I am very happy with the end result. I thought about keeping it in my own collection, but decided to list it in my Etsy shop instead.

Mini White and Pink Easter church

The base measures 4 1/8″ wide x 6″ deep. The Putz is 5″ tall as measured from the bottom of the base to the top of the steeple.

Mini White and Pink Easter church

The pattern I drew for this church was inspired by the church pictured on the vintage Easter card I used for the base.

Mini White and Pink Easter church
Mini White and Pink Easter church

A gold bell hangs freely in the steeple.

Mini White and Pink Easter church

The church yard is landscaped with preserved moss and artificial foliage.

Mini White and Pink Easter church

You can see my Putz houses and Christmas ornaments in my Etsy shop.

ChristmasNotebook.etsy.com

If you are interested in crafting some Putz houses of your own, check out my Putz tutorials for more information. Putz House Tutorials

I am always happy to answer questions about the process. Please ask, if you are wondering about the details of putzing!

All proceeds from my Etsy shop benefit Kenya Mercy Ministries. They work with the urban poor of Nairobi, Kenya, particularly the children and their families who live in Kibera, the largest slum in Africa. Thank you for your part in helping these children when you purchase items from my shop!

~~Rhonda

MINI Valentine putz house

This MINI size, Valentine Putz house is the last one I am making this season. It’s time to move on to Easter Putz! It was fun to make and fun to landscape. A lot of little details make it fun to look at.

The base measures 4 1/2″ wide x 5 1/2″ deep. The Putz is 3 3/4″ tall as measured from the bottom of the base to the top of the chimneys. As measured from the bottom of the base to the top of the arch, the Putz is 6″ tall.

MINI Purple and Pink Valentine Putz House

The base is made from an upcycled Valentine card. I like that it is purple rather than the traditional red and/or pink.

MINI Purple and Pink Valentine Putz House

The back of the Putz has the traditional hole that allows for the use of an LED light string for lighting the house.

MINI Purple and Pink Valentine Putz House

The wired arch frames the MINI house with pink and red hearts.

MINI Purple and Pink Valentine Putz House

The sidewalk is made of tiny heart-shaped stepping stones.

MINI Purple and Pink Valentine Putz House

The handcrafted, heart-shaped fence is made from poster board, painted to coordinate with the Putz house, and sprinkled with fine, clear glitter.
Pearl beads and velvet flowers nestle in the moss.

MINI Purple and Pink Valentine Putz House

The lights are on and the door is open for you and your Valentine. 

MINI Purple and Pink Valentine Putz House

You can see my Putz houses and Christmas ornaments in my Etsy shop.

ChristmasNotebook.etsy.com

If you are interested in crafting some Putz houses of your own, check out my Putz tutorials for more information. Putz House Tutorials

I am always happy to answer questions about the process. Please ask, if you are wondering about the details of putzing!

All proceeds from my Etsy shop benefit Kenya Mercy Ministries. They work with the urban poor of Nairobi, Kenya, particularly the children and their families who live in Kibera, the largest slum in Africa. Thank you for your part in helping these children when you purchase items from my shop!

~~Rhonda

Valentine putz house

I used a cardboard, candy box to make this ORIGINAL size, Valentine Putz house.

ORIGINAL Valentine Putz House

The base is made from an upcycled greeting card. It measures 5 1/2″ wide x 5″ deep. The Putz is 4″ tall as measured from the bottom of the base to the top of the roof.

ORIGINAL Valentine Putz House

The back of the Putz has the traditional hole that allows for the use of an LED light string for lighting the house.

ORIGINAL Valentine Putz House
The house is made from a heart-shaped, cardboard, candy box. After the parts were painted and the window panes installed, I glued the two pieces together.

ORIGINAL Valentine Putz House

The wooden picket fence is handcrafted from stir sticks and slivered popsicle sticks. I make a bunch of these ahead of time so I have them ready when a house needs a picket fence.

ORIGINAL Valentine Putz House

You can see my Putz houses and other Christmas ornaments in my Etsy shop.

ChristmasNotebook.etsy.com

If you are interested in crafting some Putz houses of your own, check out my Putz tutorials for more information. Putz House Tutorials

I am always happy to answer questions about the process. Please ask, if you are wondering about the details of putzing!

All proceeds from my Etsy shop benefit Kenya Mercy Ministries. They work with the urban poor of Nairobi, Kenya, particularly the children and their families who live in Kibera, the largest slum in Africa. Thank you for your part in helping these children when you purchase items from my shop!

~~Rhonda

summertime putz house

I had a lot of fun making this sweet, summertime Putz house. I had planned to make it a Valentine house, but it kept saying “summertime, summertime,” so summertime it is. I found a vintage dollhouse online that I used as inspiration for the Putz house pattern. So sweet. Not my usual design, but I am loving this house.

Untitled

The base is made from an upcycled greeting card. It measures 6 1/2″ wide x 4 3/4″ deep. The house is 4 3/4″ tall as measured from the bottom of the base to the top of the roof.

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The colors of the Putz house echo the colors on the greeting card.

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The awning is a piece of striped scrapbook card stock. I pulled it under a ruler to give it a curve, then cut the bottom with a tiny scallop, decorative scissor. To get the drop on the front edge I scored the paper on the back and carefully folded it down. To finish the awning, I used a light coat of glitter glue to give it a little sparkle, glued the awning to the house and then glued a support under each side of the awning.

Untitled

The wooden picket fence is handcrafted from slivered popsicle sticks. The front sidewalk is light-weight poster board, painted the same color as the porch floor, glittered and glued in place. To finish the sidewalk, I glued tiny bits of dried moss around it and along the spaces between the stones.

Untitled

You can see my Putz houses and other Christmas ornaments in my Etsy shop.

ChristmasNotebook.etsy.com

If you are interested in crafting some Putz houses of your own, check out my Putz tutorials for more information. Putz House Tutorials

I am always happy to answer questions about the process. Please ask, if you are wondering about the details of putzing!

All proceeds from my Etsy shop benefit Kenya Mercy Ministries. They work with the urban poor of Nairobi, Kenya, particularly the children and their families who live in Kibera, the largest slum in Africa. Thank you for your part in helping these children when you purchase items from my shop!

~~Rhonda

thatching tutorial

I love these little Irish cottages. The thatched roof on the Putz shown here is my own creation and design. Every time I thatch a cottage, I learn something new and tweak the process to make it better than the last time.

Mini Irish Cottage Putz with blessing on the base
Irish Cottage Putz House
Irish Cottage Putz House

The first time I thatched an Irish cottage, I used rafia. I like the look of the sisal much better for an Irish cottage than the rafia, though the rafia does has a look that I think would be great on a fairy house or other woodland cottage. If you find other fibers you like to use, please share!

thatched Irish cottage Putz house

Following is a tutorial for making a thatched roof using sisal. This is the way I do it, though it’s not the only way, I’m sure. It’s just my way. Give it a try! If you have any questions about the process, please ask in the comment section, below. I am always happy to help others learn the skill of Putzing.

Supplies List

  • twisted sisal rope (I use 1/4″ wide roping.)
  • Scissors
  • Cutting mat
  • Carding / Combing tool
  • Chipboard or poster board
  • Hot glue gun and glue sticks
  • Paper folding tool (also called a bone folder)
  • Acrylic ruler
  • X-acto knife or box cutter

NOTE: The first time I bought twisted sisal rope, I bought this one: Wellington Cordage. When I ran out of that, I bought SGT KNOTS. The one I just purchased (SGT KNOTS) hasn’t had the knots the Wellington had, and is easier to work with. I haven’t used much of it yet, but am liking it better than the first brand. The second brand has three stands to make the rope and each of those stands is made of two strands. I bought these on Amazon.com, but you can purchases this kind of rope at any hardware store. Be sure it is labeled “sisal.” And be sure it isn’t coated with anything.

Glue a roof to your Putz to use as a base for gluing down the thatching strips. I use a medium-weight poster board. I painted and glittered it to match the sisal, but that isn’t really necessary. After you’ve thatched a few houses, you will have a feel for how thick the thatching should be so the roof base doesn’t show through the thatch. Painting it just insures that any places that do show the base are much less noticable than if the chipboard or poster board is left plain.

To make the strips that the sisal is glued to, find a piece of poster board (or cardboard) just a bit wider than the width of the roof. It will be trimmed before it is glued to the roof.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

Cut the poster board into 1/2″ wide strips. I used a box cutter to do this because the sand in my paint mixture is hard on the X-acto blades. I should have painted it without the sand mixed it, but didn’t think about that until I had it painted.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

The sisal rope I used is a 1/4″ twisted rope of three strands, each of which are made up of three strands. Those strands need to be separated.

I have found that three rows of thatching works well for most of my cottages, but this pattern, which I drew recently, needed an extra strip on top. More about that later. Cut at least six strips to start with.

NOTE: The thatching could be made on one long strip, then cut as needed. For reference, I made 15 inches of thatching with 30 inches of rope. Fifteen inches of thatching made three strips for the front of the cottage. Length needed depends, of course, on how big your cottage is. This particular one is five inches wide.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

I originally drew the pattern for this cottage so that the sides of the roof extended 1/4″ past the walls of the house.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

I decided later that the house would look better if the side walls were not obstructed by those overhangs. I cut the 1/4″ overhangs off and was happier with the cleaner look. I think it shows off the shape of the chimney better than it had before. I changed the pattern to reflect that. I mention it here, so there is no confusion about overhangs in some pics and no overhangs in others.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

Cut a 10″ length of rope. This is a comfortable length for me to work with. As you work with the rope you have, try different lengths to see what works best for you.

Separate the strands that make up the rope.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

Depending on the rope you are using, the strands that make up the rope may be made of two or three stands themselves. Those need to be separated, too.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

You could even leave the rope on the roll, unwrap a section that is comfortable to work with and cut it off the roll after it has been combed. Find a way that works for you.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

The next step is to “card” or comb the strands to separate the individual fibers. I have what I assume is a carding tool. It came from my mother. I don’t know what it’s use is supposed to be, but it works great for this process. I am not sure what else would work, but perhaps a felting tool? Or a wool or flax carding tool? If you’re handy, you could possibly make your own carding tool using a board and long nails. If you have other suggestions, please post them below.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

Pull the tool through the strands of sisal. You can work with as many strands at a time as you are able to comb through. Sometimes sisal rope has lumps or knots in a strand and those have to be worked out. Be careful. Work slowly until you get the hang of it. It’s not fun to bring those spikes down on your thumb or fingers. Also, this is hard on your cutting mat. Use an old one if you have one handy.

The following picture shows the results of the beginning of the combing process. The fibers on the end of the strands are becoming unraveled from each other.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

I work on each end, and when they are done, I work out the middle. It’s easier to comb the strands in two or three-inch sections than to try to do the entire length at one time.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

When it is completely free of tangles, I fold it in half so I have a nice chunk to work with. Don’t trim the ends yet. The trim is more even if the entire length of thatching is trimmed at the same time.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

Put enough hot glue on the chipboard strip to match the width of the fiber bundle. Cover the area completely.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

Set the fibers on the glued strip, leaving plenty to trim later.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

Trim the looped fibers along the strip of poster board. Continue gluing down fibers until the strip is covered. I use the paper folding tool (bone folder) to hold the fibers down as the glue hardens.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

Moving it back and forth slightly as the glue cures keeps the folding tool from sticking. Any glue that does adhere to it comes right off the plastic.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

If you look closely at the photo, you can see the pressed line where the folding tool was used.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

Trim the fibers to a straight line.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

The back of the strips will look like the following. Note that since I took this picture, I have learned to trim the top of the fibers very close to the strip. It will help the strips fit together more tightly when glued to the roof. Fewer gaps.

putz house thatched roof tutorial


Trim each end of the strip so it is about 3/8″ short of either side of the roof. Glue the strip to the bottom of the roof. Set the poster board strip just above the edge of the long side of the roof.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

Make more strips. 🙂 Glue the second strip so the trimmed thatching on strip #2 overlaps the thatching of the first row. I find the 1/2″ strips can be glued right up against the one below it. But the placement will depend on how high the roof is and how thick the thatch is. Sometimes you have to eyeball it.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

Thatching row #3 may need to be trimmed a bit shorter to fit against the chimney.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

You can see the raw edges that were left when I trimmed the extra 1/4″ overhang off the sides of the roof.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

I painted and glittered them. All better.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

Time to do the back of the Putz.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

Here is the first strip for the back, prior to trimming.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

And now, trimmed and glued down.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

To finish the edges of the roof, I use intact rope, cut to length. Use sharp, heavy-duty scissors and cut slowly to get a clean cut that doesn’t unravel the rope.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

This piece of rope will give the edge of the thatching a finished look. The 1/4″ wide rope works very well for this step. Just the right size. I haven’t found it necessary to put glue on the ends of the strands on this piece, but that can be done with white glue if it looks like the rope may unravel.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

Check the top of the roof. If a piece of rope will cover the remaining gap and the glue line, you can glue that piece of trim down. If the gap is too wide to cover with one piece of rope, you can fill it with more thatching.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

Cut a piece of poster board to fit inside the remaining gap. Glue thatching across it, so it extends the same width on either side of the post board.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

It will look like this from the bottom.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

Glue the strip into the gap, poster board down, thatch on top.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

Glue a piece of rope on top the thatching.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

putz house thatched roof tutorial
putz house thatched roof tutorial

Any spots that don’t look their best can be covered with dried moss, artificial foliage or flowers.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

If you have a cottage with the chimneys set on the ridge of the roof, you will need to make some adjustments to thatch around those chimneys. In this example, five separate pieces of thatch were used: to the outside of each chimney, between the chimneys and under the chimneys.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

When the first three patches were on, I went back and set a bit of thatching under each chimney.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

When all the pieces are glued down, trim the bottom of the thatching row to a clean, straight line.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

To add the rope trim, I glued it next to the chimney before I cut it.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

putz house thatched roof tutorial

Because the trim piece is so short, it unravels less if already glued to the roof before cutting.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

A short piece in the middle and the trim along the sides of the roof, and it’s ready for landscaping.

putz house thatched roof tutorial
putz house thatched roof tutorial
putz house thatched roof tutorial

How cute is that?? I find them so appealing. And the landscaping is so much fun.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

If you look closely, you may be able to see that I brushed the thatch with gold glitter glue for a light shine and a tiny bit of glitter. It IS a Putz house, after all! I didn’t want a heavy hand of glitter that might mask the charm of the thatch, but I did like the effect the glitter glue gave it. Just a nice shimmer that ties the thatching to the rest of the glitter on the Putz.

putz house thatched roof tutorial

For a very light glitter finish, I like this brand. I have it in gold, silver, green, red, blue and opalescent. It contains a very fine glitter. They all flow well from the bottle except the silver. I think I’m on my third bottle of silver, and they’ve all been thicker and more sluggish than the other colors. I just use a paint brush to dip out the silver glue and apply it.

glitter glue

I hope you’ve enjoyed the tutorial. I would love to see pictures of what you create! If you have any questions about the art of Putzing, please ask. I am happy to help.

If you have suggestions or other supplies you like to use for this process, please share!

~~Rhonda

2018 chalkboard Christmas tree

Last year, beginning in December and going forward about six months, I had a lot of trouble with my blog. Many things weren’t posted last Christmas, including the chalkboard tree for 2018. After posting the start of this year’s tree, I realized I never posted last year’s tree. I’ll fix that now!

The theme for last year, 2018, was “I’ll be home for Christmas.” This was our seventh chalkboard Christmas tree and may have been our most ambitious tree yet.

2018 chalkboard Christmas tree`

I began the process of finding pictures we could use. I searched online and found printable coloring pages that I thought would work. My sister Genny and I laid them out in the order that made sense to us.

2018 chalkboard Christmas tree`

Then the tracing began. We use white graphite paper to trace the pictures onto the chalkboard. And it all takes time…!

2018 chalkboard Christmas tree`

The tree was going to tell the story of a family gathering for the holidays, using the song “I’ll be Home for Christmas” as our inspiration.

2018 chalkboard Christmas tree`

Beginning at the bottom of the tree, the story unfolded, one panel at a time. By the lamp post, in the front yard, children are building a snowman and a young boy greets you from the gate, along with our cat Clark.

2019 chalkboard Christmas tree

The next level up the tree features the car, piled with gifts and holiday cheer, as they head home for Christmas.

2019 chalkboard Christmas tree

There’s the excitement of arriving home, with all the joyful greetings!

2018 chalkboard Christmas tree`

The children are counting down the days with their Advent calendar.
I thought the branches, with the multiple kinds of greenery, were particularly pretty on this tree.

2019 chalkboard Christmas tree

And Dad is putting up the lights!

2018 chalkboard Christmas tree`

Grandma is baking our favorite Christmas cookies!

2019 chalkboard Christmas tree

Everyone pitches in wrapping the special gifts.

2018 chalkboard Christmas tree`

The Christmas Eve service puts the focus where it should be…the birth of Christ, our Savior.

Chalkboard Christmas Tree 2018

Everyone enjoys the children’s Christmas program.

2019 chalkboard Christmas tree

And then it’s Christmas morning and time to unwrap the presents!

2019 chalkboard Christmas tree

Our cat Winston enjoys the warm fire while the snow piles up outside.

2018 chalkboard Christmas tree`

This year, along with the lights around the chalkboard, we added popcorn and cranberry strings to each branch. They are a tradition in our family!

2019 chalkboard Christmas tree

The ceilings are 12′ high. The chalkboard is about 8 1/2′ tall.

Christmas 2018

We hope you have the joy of going home for Christmas!

2018 chalkboard Christmas tree`

You can find the other chalkboard Christmas trees we’ve made by searching this blog for “chalkboard Christmas tree.”

Merry Christmas! ~~Rhonda

2019 Christmas chalkboard tree

It’s that time of year at our house…we begin prep for the holidays, including baking cookies for the freezer to serve at our annual Christmas Open House and we also start some decorating the first part of October. Too soon for many, I know, but we have our open house on the first Sunday in December each year and that means starting early so we are ready for the big day.

Last weekend, my sister came down to begin work on this year’s Christmas chalkboard tree. I decided to use the song “C-H-R-I-S-T-M-A-S” as the theme for this year’s tree. I searched online for coloring pages and clip art of the images I wanted for the tree. The pictures can’t be too detailed as that makes them difficult to execute in chalk.

2019 chalkboard Christmas tree

We use white transfer paper to trace the designs onto the chalkboard.

2019 chalkboard Christmas tree

I do the design work and my sister does the chalking. Here she is making the first strokes of what will be hours of chalk work.

2019 chalkboard Christmas tree

Winston is our most sociable cat and he likes to be where the action is. He is also partial to ladders, so takes an opportunity to inspect our work when he can.

2019 chalkboard Christmas tree

The color is off in this picture, but here’s a preview of what’s to come.

2019 chalkboard Christmas tree

We will chalk in the branches as we go along. And there will be other additions…stars to fill in space, candles, etc.

2019 chalkboard Christmas tree

Stay tuned for updates! ~~Rhonda